Archive for the Magick Category

Mythologically Speaking

Posted in Magick, Wyrd on February 16, 2022 by Occult Detective

“I believe in everything until it’s disproved. So I believe in fairies, the myths, dragons. It all exists, even if it’s in your mind. Who’s to say that dreams and nightmares aren’t as real as the here and now?” 

― John Lennon

I had a peculiar moment when I was a small boy. Growing up in the Midwest, there’s a staple to that upbringing that is prevalent for most — church services on Sunday. While I must assume the vast majority of children buy into whatever religion the adults in their lives is selling, it never clicked with me in any meaningful way.

I enjoyed Sunday School well enough. Was never much more than story-time, really. During sermons I was armed with tiny tablets of paper from my grandma’s pocketbook, drawing Universal Monsters, alien spaceships, and super-heroes while some old man rattled away about original sin and the passion play.

The kicker was some innocuous reference to the Christianization of Heathens, usually by the sword, that triggered a thought in me that this desert religion being fostered upon me was not the faith of my ancestors, but one saddled upon them by conquering forces. My ancestors, those who called Northern Europe their home, believed in an altogether different pantheon of deities, deities I read about in books by Hamilton and Bulfinch and the like, that I found in picture books and comics, and in movies on Saturday afternoons.

I went into the school library and checked out a book by Padraic Colum called The Children of Odin and devoured it, realizing as I immersed myself in this tales of the ancient Norse, that these were the stories my forefathers told around the campfire — stories of Odin and Thor, Loki and Frigga, Sif and Freya, Balder, and more.

It occurred to me, as a boy not yet even ten, that these stories should mean more to me than those found in the Old and New Testament.

The myths of a culture are defining references that speak to a greater truth, that showcase virtues that a people held in high estimation. This was cemented even more once I had discovered the Havamal and began adding Celtic tales to my growing obsession.

Myths were the attempt of our ancestors to answer difficult questions about te world around them. They were teaching tools, disguised as colorful stories, that spoke of mighty beings and devious creatures that were as important to their daily lives as their flesh and blood.

These ancient gods were a real and vibrant force. Before philosophy and science, mythology defined the universe for those who came before us.

As these mythological entities were stripped away from us, so too was the magic that held us together as tribes and communities. The common bong was severed, as we lost our ties to the gods that breathed life into us and to the very land from which we sprang, then slowly over the centuries we became unmoored and lost.

Recapturing those tales that spoke so eloquently to our ancestors, reminds of of those ties that bind us. They call out from beyond the pale, life breathed anew into their lungs.

Why do I study mythology? Because they are my roots and without roots, a tree cannot stand.

Bob Freeman
occultdetective.com
writing from the banks of
Little Pipe Creek

My Thoughts on @LlewellynBooks’ Norse Divination: Illuminating Your Path with the Wisdom of the Gods by Gypsey Elaine Teague

Posted in Book Review, Magick, Wyrd on February 10, 2022 by Occult Detective

Journey into the Norse Pantheon to Uncover the Secrets of Your Past, Present, and Future

Reveal your life’s path in a brand-new way with Norse Divination, the only book designed around the Nordic gods themselves rather than the Futhark. Through concise yet enlightening analyses of these deities and their relationships to each other, you’ll unlock answers to your deepest questions and find more happiness and success.

An excellent primer on Norse mythology, this book teaches you how to easily create your own thirty-six-piece divination set and use it to explore the gods and goddesses’ beliefs, customs, loves, and deaths. Each deity, along with important mythological items, has a dedicated chapter outlining who they are, what their role is, and how they can help you divine the best course of action in any scenario. Featuring clear and thorough instruction on how to read all thirty-six pieces in their past, present, and future positions, Norse Divination helps you harness hidden knowledge and forge a unique practice.

Let me be honest right out of the gate: this is not the book I was expecting. Now let me explain why that’s not a bad thing.

I suppose I should first interject my obligatory apology for being late to review this. By now, you’re well aware of my bout with the plague. But that’s behind me now and we’ve one last book review to make good on, in this case, something that enters into the magical realm I am most connected to and enamored by — Northern European Heathenry — via Gypsey Elaine Teague’s aforementioned book, Norse Divination.

As stated above, I expected something quite different from this one, something more akin to an exploration of the runes. This is not that. I have read Gypsey’s work before, having read, reviewed, and enjoyed her work on The Witch’s Guide to Wands. I should have known by that work that I would be getting something fresh, unique, and wonderful.

That’s how I found Norse Divination. Teague knows her heathenry and has a special connection to the gods. As a scholar, she acknowledges the scant information we have on the people and faith that sprang out of those ancient climes, but through this connection that has blossomed over time and space, with so many being reunited with these godforms, Gypsey is able to bring the past in line with the present to deliver a remarkable system of divination that honors the roots from which it springs.

Utilizing 42 symbols, Gypsey has developed from her rune work a system that brings the gods into the mix. It is very intuitive, and I created for myself makeshift disks, burning the symbols into the wood. What I found was a very natural and insightful set of divination tools that fulfill their promise.

As always, I find Gypsey’s words meaningful and comfortable and believe you will find them the same. As for the book itself, well, it’s a thing of beauty. The interior design and layout is wonderful, but the star of the show is that magnificent cover. I could stare at that one all day.

If you’ve a love of divination, this book is for you and demands a place on your library shelf. For many heathens, well, this might be too outside the box for them, but I do hope they would be open-minded enough to not dismiss it out of hand. I lean toward more traditionalism as well, but found this to be inspired and worthwhile.

Norse Divination: Illuminating Your Path with the Wisdom of the Gods by Gypsey Elaine Teague is available wherever books are sold. I encourage you to bring this one home.

My thoughts on Kelden’s Witches’ Sabbath

Posted in Book Review, Magick on February 2, 2022 by Occult Detective

As I write this, the morning after Imbolc, I await Winter Storm Landon’s arrival. Rain is pelting the canopy over the back door, evolving ever so slowly into sleet, before the increasing eventuality of voluminous snowfall that threatens a visit to these haunted climes.

It seems a good time to share with you my thoughts on The Witches’ Sabbath: An Exploration of History, Folklore, and Modern Practice by Kelden, especially in light of recent events.

I was riding a high after watching the latest episode of Kindred Spirits featuring paranormal investigators Amy Bruni and Adam Berry, which presented a ritual, The Shroud of the Revenant, from Greg Newkirk of Hellier fame. I love that kind of innovation. But that high was soon soured by Travel Channel’s latest paranormal entertainment series, Vampires In America, which is the very worst sort of sensationalist garbage that damages the entire paranormal community. Couple that with the gods awful documentary, The Book of Secrets: Aliens, Ghosts, and Ancient Mysteries, and, well, my resolve was all but shattered.

So, writing this review is, in many ways, cathartic —a way to rekindle my faith in the magical community, and a reminder that there is a wealth good to be found there. It just requires a bit of digging sometimes.

First, allow me to share Llewellyn’s introduction:

Discover the Hidden Depths of the Sabbath

Take flight for a mesmerizing exploration of an event long shrouded in fear and mystery―the Witches’ Sabbath. Kelden presents an in-depth examination of the Sabbath’s historical and folkloric development as well as its re-emergence within the modern practice of Witchcraft. From discussions on the folklore of flight and the events of nocturnal gatherings to enchanting rituals and recipes, you’ll find everything you need to not only understand the nature of the legendary Sabbath, but also journey there yourself. Offering impressive research and compelling stories from across Europe and the early American colonies, this book is the ultimate resource for discovering an oft misunderstood and overlooked aspect of Witchcraft.

Includes a foreword by Jason Mankey, author of The Horned God of the Witches

I received an advanced copy of The Witches’ Sabbath in mid-December just as my bout with the dreaded plague was sinking its tendrils into me. This book was a gift from the gods as it was a welcome distraction from my discomfort. While the book was released in the US in January, its February release in Canada and the UK helps alleviate some of the guilt I feel for not reviewing this book sooner.

Beyond addressing the book’s content, can I first gush over Tim Foley’s gorgeous woodcut that graces the cover? I love the colors, the stark blacks, and the otherworldly imagery that takes me back to my childhood, when I first took those fateful baby-steps into the world of witchcraft. Delicious by all accounts.

As for Kelden’s work, it is a wonderful read. A bit disjointed, perhaps, with an odd narrative, but I sort of like it. Kelden’s writing style matches the theme and tone of the book, which is both a concise and comprehensive exploration of the Witches’ Sabbath, in folklore and in practice today.

This is the place of wild magic, beyond myth and fantasy, where the shadow realm thrives outside this earthly realm and awaits for initiates to discover its location. Kelden does a masterful job of invoking the essence of its true nature, of presenting it through solid academic research to give it substance, but also through fanciful examination of legend and lore to expand upon its majestic presence beyond the veil.

The Witches’ Sabbath is whimsical and fantastic and wholly enchanting. It is a promise, an affirmation, if you will, of all that is wonderful and magical and dangerous about the world of witchcraft. So much of this has been lost in the past few decades. It’s nice to see the satanic majesty of it all reaffirmed.

Beyond the academia, you will find a wealth of practical exercises and spellwork to align yourself for visiting the Sabbath, should you fain to do so. While I found some of the exercises somewhat lackluster, overall it’s an ambitious undertaking, and I recommend it on many levels.

I see this work as imagination fuel. While the path may not be exactly the one you wish to travel, the very idea of it can lead you toward the proper trail where fancy becomes reality.

A delightful read that I recommend without hesitation, Kelden’s The Witches’ Sabbath: An Exploration of History, Folklore, and Modern Practice is available wherever books are sold. You’ll certainly want this one in your home library.

My thoughts on Elemental Powers for Witches by Frater Barrabbas (spoiler alert — it’s terrific)

Posted in Book Review, Magick on January 28, 2022 by Occult Detective

I’m still trying to get back into the swing of things after my bout with the plague. I found it hard to concentrate on reading for any real length of time during the height of it, but I did find that in those moments when I could wrap myself up inside a book, it was an important part of the healing process.

One of the books I found solace in was the latest release from Frater Barrabbas, an author I have been keen on approaching, particularly his book Spirit Conjuring for Witches. So, when offered a chance to read Elemental Powers for Witches, I was more than eager to do so.

Before I give you my brief thoughts on the book, let’s hear what Llewellyn has to say about it:

Bring Element-Based Ceremonial Magic into your Modern Witchcraft

What was once only available to ceremonial magicians can now be yours with this guide to advanced elemental energy work. Frater Barrabbas presents a ritual system that uses the forty qualified powers as well as the sixteen elementals―paired elements, such as earth of water, that create a more articulated expression of magical power. A companion to Spirit Conjuring for Witches, this book covers working with your own energy, uncrossing mechanisms that remove internal blocks, and a variety of magical tools, including sigils, pentacles, and crystals.

Featuring numerous illustrations and diagrams, Elemental Powers for Witches teaches you how to use specialized ritual energy patterns that are more effective than the regular witch’s circle. Frater Barrabbas walks you through exciting new rituals he has developed over the years, including the eight-node magic circle, invoking and banishing spirals, Western and Eastern gateways, the Rose Cross Vortex Rite, and more. From using the tarot as a Book of Shadows to calling upon elemental spirits, this book helps you enhance your practice while staying true to your primary tradition of the Craft.

First, I really appreciate what Frater Barrabbas is looking to accomplish here — to offer up alternative practices through a systematic, yet simplified exploration of ceremonial magick. It is ambitious and well plotted. If ceremonial practices are not your thing, this book may very well be for you. Afterward, I suspect you’ll change your tune.

While I found some of the text a bit rambling in parts, Barrabbas has ultimately created a terrific system of magick, synthesizing a veritable smorgasbord of occult practices all under one umbrella, from yoga to tarot to sigil magic and more.

For someone new to magick, or with little experience, this is a superb primer and initiatory starting point. It is elegant at times and insightful, with a lot of knowledge and background all in its core, creating a firm foundation from which to build on. It puts me in mind of some of Donald Tyson’s work in the late 1980s.

All in all, a book I highly recommend, for those new to ways of magick and those more seasoned. I certainly found some very useful practices within. As a magical system, steeped as is in the western tradition, it’s solid, inspiring, and most important, it’s useful.

You want to do more than learn about magick? Do you want to practice the art? Well, you really need look no further. This book will set you on a path from which you can grow and prosper from.

Elemental Powers for Witches: Energy Magic Simplified by Frater Barrabbas is available wherever books are sold. I give this one my highest recommendation.

Some quick thoughts on Welsh Witchcraft by Mhara Starling (2/22), now available for preorder

Posted in Book Review, Magick on December 1, 2021 by Occult Detective

The history of magic and witchcraft in Wales will inspire any modern-day witch. Written by a Welsh practitioner, this book shares the magical traditions of the land of the red dragon, exploring deities, fairies, folklore, charms, plants, and magic with dozens of exercises for hands-on practice.

Explore the history and terminology of Welsh magic and methods for honoring the land. Learn to connect with Cerridwen, Rhiannon, and other deities as well as fairies and mystical creatures. Discover how you can incorporate traditional Welsh folk magic into your modern witchcraft practice, with exercises for honoring those who came before, connecting with the spirit of your home, protecting against adversity and malignant spirits, changing the weather, and much more.

I get the feeling this is a book that a lot of readers new to witchcraft will find appealing. It’s got a scholarly air to it, especially to fresh faces, seemingly steeped in lore that feels ancient, while written in a very modern voice by a very modern author.

The book is packed with information and is dense at times, like the author is desperate to get all these little bits of knowledge out there. It’s a tad breathless, but its heart is genuine. The exercises and meditations are solid and personal. Which is true of the book as a whole. This is Mhara Starling’s personal journey and she has invited the reader along, offering her experiences as guideposts along the way.

This is both a strength and a weakness.

I like the cover. Evocative and simple. And I like the book, overall. It’s like a DJ Conway book on steroids. You remember those. Well, you do if you’re of a certain age.

Look, I wanted a book on Welsh Witchcraft. This is not that. Not really. It’s Wicca wearing a Welsh Hallowe’en costume, but you know what, the older I get, the more I’m okay with that. There is a place for these types of occult books. They are ideal for young people finding their way. I know I sure read a lot of them in the 80s. Right?

So, do I recommend Mhara Starling’s Welsh Witchcraft? Certainly. It is not for the seasoned student, nor for someone longing for a deep rooted connection to an ancient lore system. But it’s fun, informative, and there’s bits and pieces that you’ll find quite useful.

These sort of primers in cultural dress are a part of the scene. They sell. They’re safe.

Welsh Witchcraft: A Guide to the Spirits, Lore, and Magic of Wales by Mhara Starling will be available in February, wherever books are sold. It’s available for preorder right now, for less than 20 bones.

Lloniannau!

Magic(k) in Paranormal Investigations with Shawn, Michelle, Eilfie, and Me

Posted in Investigations, Magick, Occult Detectives, Paranormal on November 5, 2021 by Occult Detective

“Bob Freeman, Eilfie Music, and Michelle Belanger talk about the use of magic before, during, and after paranormal investigations. They all share their personal practices and stories of real-life investigations.”

A few nights before All Hallow’s Eve I joined Shawn Hebert for a roundtable discussion regarding the use of magic(k) in paranormal investigations to launch the second season of his podcast, The LVX Files. The real stars of the episode were the whimsical and ethereal Eilfie Music, whom I adore, and the erudite and perspicacious Michelle Belanger. Both are paranormal television veterans, having cut their teeth on Paranormal State which ran from 2007-2011. Michelle, of course, in addition to being an author, has gone on to be a part of a number of other programs, including Jack Osbourne and Katrina Weidman’s Portals to Hell.

Just to give you a few insights into the discussion, firstly I was very much under the weather. I had been suffering from a pretty nasty ear infection and between the pain medication and antibiotics it’s a wonder I was coherent at all. Luckily, Eilfie and Michelle were on top of their game and did the heavy lifting. Secondly, I was having all kinds of technical issues. Not only was my internet dropping in and out, but the overhead in my den was giving me fits, hence the dim lighting.

All that being said, man did I have a ball in this discussion. This was my second time as a guest on The LVX Files and Shawn is a terrific host. He’s just so comfortable to talk with and is able to direct the conversations effortlessly. I appreciate that he is always a part of the moment. A lot of interviewers tend to be aloof and separate from the subject. Shawn is not shy about climbing into the mud with his guests and that’s much appreciated.

While our roundtable tended to focus on the television side of things, which was completely reasonable considering Michelle and Eilfie’s pedigree, there was a lot of good general information that dropped.

Let me explain things a bit from my perspective. I have zero interest in gathering evidence to prove a location is haunted to the public. I have zero interest in whether the public at large believe in the multiverse of dimensions that exist and are home to the vast array of entities that make up what some call the spirit world. I have a vested interest in helping people who do believe they have encountered these beings, in whatever form they take, and I am compelled to interact with them, for my own interests and in the interest of helping those in need.

I don’t feel like the so-called “scientific method” used in paranormal investigations is of much use beyond looking good on television. The gadgets tend to give an air of verisimilitude to the viewer. It gives them something tangible to focus on when, in reality, the best tool an investigator has is their 5 (or 6) senses. Unfortunately, that does not make for “good television”.

So, what do I use beyond those senses?

A typical investigation finds me first doing a tarot or rune reading beforehand. Usually tarot. This gives me a feel for the place. Next, I do a sweep of the location with copper dowsing rods. This helps me isolate the active areas and gives me a clue as to what sort of energy I am dealing with. Then, I open a dialogue, sometimes using a digital recorder or ghost box app. I’ll sometimes utilize scrying mirrors, summoning circles, blasting rods… the whole occult arsenal.

Having an opportunity to chat with like-minded people was a thrill for me. It’s more rare than you’d imagine. We occult detectives are an isolated breed. And for the talk to go down with three of my favorite people, well, that’s just icing on the proverbial cake. With luck, we’ll have the opportunity to rattle the chains of the departed together, in some lonesome clime or long forgotten hall… when these plague days are well behind us.

Three for Thursday? How about 10 #Occult Books that got me through the pandemic

Posted in Book Review, Magick on September 16, 2021 by Occult Detective

PAN-DEMIC READS EDITION

For today’s Three for Thursday, I thought I would make a list of the occult/spiritual books that were released during (or just before) the pandemic set in that have helped me get through it. Who knows, maybe you missed some of these and could use a little pick me up? Let’s face it, the pandemic is far from over. Best settle in with a good book and live inside your head a bit.

HONORABLE MENTION
The Dictionary of Demons:
Names of the Damned
Tenth Anniversary Edition
by Michelle Belanger

TEN
Angels & Archangels:
A Magician’s Guide
by Damien Echols

NINE
The Four Elements of the Wise:
Working with the Magickal Powers of
Earth, Air, Water, Fire
by Ivo Dominguez Jr

EIGHT
The Morrigan:
Celtic Goddess of Magick and Might
by Courtney Weber

SEVEN
Psychic Witch:
A Metaphysical Guide to
Meditation, Magick & Manifestation
by Mat Auryn

SIX
Elemental Witchcraft:
A Guide to Living a Magickal Life
Through the Elements
by Heron Michelle

FIVE
The Witch’s Path:
Advancing Your Craft at Every Level
by Thorn Mooney

FOUR
Lost Teachings of the Runes:
Northern Mysteries and the Wheel of Life
by Ingrid Kincaid

THREE
Beyond the North Wind:
The Fall and Rise of the Mystic North
by Christopher McIntosh

TWO
The Wanderer’s Havamal /
The Saga of the Volsungs
with The Saga of Ragnar Lothbrok
by Jackson Crawford

ONE
Allow Me to Introduce:
An Insider’s Guide to the Occult
by Lon Milo DuQuette

Another Wyrd Wednesday: Preorder This Book Now — Elemental Witchcraft by Heron Michelle

Posted in Book Review, Magick on September 15, 2021 by Occult Detective

Following in the wake of the last two reviews, Elemental Witchcraft: A Guide to Living a Magickal Life Through the Elements by Heron Michelle is a breath of fresh air. Before I dive in, here’s the publisher’s blurb:

Elemental Witchcraft shares a wholly unique esoteric approach to developing partnerships with elemental allies and deities and ultimately merging with the Divine Mind. Author Heron Michelle provides dozens of rituals, meditations, spells, and journal reflections as you explore the principles of Hermeticism and the magick of the four classical elements―earth, air, fire, and water. On this journey, you will discover how the chakras and the magickal pentacle correspond to the five bodies: mental, emotional, will, physical, and spiritual. You will also explore how the astrological cycles and the wheel of the year relate to the elements and the witch’s tools as well as to the paths of power, truth, sovereignty, and completion. Opening the elemental gateways and developing relationship with the goddesses and gods can be profoundly transformative work―this book guides you through this subtle path as you learn to balance the magickal elements and construct your own astral temples at the crossroads of the Self.

Alright, first, go pre-order this book right now. You want it on your shelf. Trust me, there are ideas and thought processes that, while I might not swallow all of it, makes one think. And that is always a good thing. Heron Michelle is bringing something fresh an innovative to the game. That takes courage. And I like a lot of it.

Yes, it sort of leans toward that 21st Century psychobabble that generally turns me away from such, but the author’s presentation is sincere, honest, and intelligent. Her heart is in the right place, and her fresh perspective on magical practice will hopefully engender you to look at your own work and help you to express yourself in new and exciting ways.

There are some things I disagree with, such as her stance on entering and exiting magic circles, but even in this, when she warns against cutting through with an athame, her argument is presented reasonably. This is a woman that has explored her Craft and has made it a personal process outside of traditional auspices.

There are quite a number of exercises and spells throughout, and I would encourage you to take them to heart. You will enjoy the work she leads you through and find them comfortable and intuitive.

And that’s what I find so enthralling about Michelle’s Elemental Witchcraft and the Pentacle Path as she presents it, it’s comfortable. It feels warm and inviting. She writes with passion, but reservedly, like a teacher. This is easily one of my favorite esoteric reads of the past couple of years, what I’m calling Pandemic Must-Reads, falling just behind Thorn Mooney’s The Witch’s Path and just ahead of Mat Auryn’s Psychic Witch. I’ll be posting that list on Thursday, September 16.

Oh, and as for the book itself — just look at that cover. Gorgeous. You’ll also find the graphic design and layout equally pleasing, with smart, eligible fonts and chapter headings. The real kicker for me is the art. I adore the illustrations throughout, some by Heron Michelle herself, with other work by Llewellyn’s Art Department and Mickie Mueller.

So, there you have it. Elemental Witchcraft: A Guide to Living a Magickal Life Through the Elements by Heron Michelle. Pre-order it here and devour it this coming Yule. You won’t regret it.

Wyrd Wednesday: Book Reviews (Part I)

Posted in Book Review, Magick on September 15, 2021 by Occult Detective

Normally I post book reviews on Mánadagr, but man, this week has been a real bear. I lost a friend to cancer over the weekend, another friend announced on Monday that he has been placed in hospice and does not have much time left with us, and I was, in a word, distracted. That’s the thing about getting older — the longer in the tooth you get, the more people you have to say goodbye to. We comfort ourselves in the knowledge that we are eternal beings, enveloped by flesh and bone. Our soul and spirit, once released from this plane of matter, embark on new adventures throughout the multiverse — those dimensions that intersect with this material plane. This knowledge does little to alleviate the sadness. I feel deeply for their family and friends. It is an enduring cycle of grief that subsides only when we become the one grieved for.

Hm, maybe these thoughts would have been better suited for a Monday.

How about we look at not one, not two, but three books today? I’ll split these into two blog posts, with the main focus being on the second blog. The first, which you’re reading now, will cover two books, but, also, will not really be a review of either, but rather my gut impressions. To be fair, I ended up skim reading both in the end and neither will find a permanent home on my bookshelves.

Beginning with the lesser of the two, I read Rise of the Witch: Making Magick Happen Your Way by Whiskey Stevens and it was… not good. I don’t like to write bad reviews. I’d much rather lead you to a good book than to dissect a book that doesn’t work for me. Sort of the “if you’ve got nothing good to say” approach. This one, however, stuck in my proverbial craw a bit.

Here’s what the publisher had to say about it:

Rise, Witch, Rise

It’s time to claim your magical power and build a practice that is wholly yours―one that spiritually fulfills you and reveals your purpose. More than a how-to guide, Rise of the Witch is a deep exploration of the inner workings of witchcraft and your integral role in creating magick. Whiskey Stevens provides a comprehensive look at both the basics and more advanced topics, taking you from the history of the Craft to shadow work and everywhere in between.

Rise of the Witch teaches a wide variety of magickal skills, such as creating and casting spells, harnessing powerful energies, and making sacred space. Whiskey also empowers those who are hesitant to come out as witches or need to keep their practice secret. Packed with guidance on the elements, tarot, intuition, and more, this book helps you fully embrace your unique brand of magick.

Includes a foreword by Panda Bennett, creator of Stardust Soul Oracle and host of the YouTube series “Witch Hunt”.

Look, I don’t want to beat up on the author too much. That’s just not my thing, but there’s nothing new in this book. Nothing. It’s just a rehash of ideas by far better writers. There are no interesting takes, no fresh or interesting divergences or developments. There are no innovations.

She has chapters on initiation, tarot, shadow work, and more, but she never comes across as an authority. She’s comes across as young, inexperienced, and someone who is playing dress-up.

But that’s my two cents. I would not recommend it.

The second book, Paganism for Prisoners by Awyn Dawn is far better, while still falling a bit short. It has a terrific introduction by Christopher Penczak, which gave me high hopes for what was to follow. The thing is, there is almost a great book here. Like Rise of the Witch, it treads very common ground, but I felt the author lost focus.

Here’s the publisher’s description:

After being incarcerated for her struggles with drug addiction, author Awyn Dawn began to actively look for her spiritual side―and she found it in Paganism. By developing a profound relationship with the gods, Awyn gained greater clarity and a deep sense of peace. You can, too, with help from this empowering guide to starting and strengthening your spiritual practice.

Providing dozens of easy-to-use exercises, Paganism for Prisoners shows you how to embrace Pagan teachings and learn from deities, ancestors, and spirits. Explore the power of meditation, self-reflection, rituals, and devotions. Meet the gods and goddesses of Celtic, Norse, Greek, Roman, and other mythologies. You’ll also discover the power of the elements, the moon, the Wheel of the Year, and your own intuition. Through this book, you’ll manifest amazing change within yourself.

Her journey is amazing, and I am thrilled that magick helped her find her way, both in and out of prison and addiction, and if the book would have stayed in that lane, then I would have been shouting from the rooftops about it. Unfortunately, for me, it strayed too far from this premise.

I guess the crux of the matter lies in that I wanted so much more from this book. I wanted it to feel more personal. The author has a comfortable writing style. There are a lot of positives here that she can build from and I would certainly read something from her in the future.

While Paganism for Prisoners did not deliver for me personally, I do feel like there is an audience for this book and I hope it might work for you. Give it a look here.

OCCULTOBER is coming

Posted in Magick, Paranormal, Wyrd on September 10, 2021 by Occult Detective
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