Now Available — Weiser Classics Editions of Liber Null & Psychonaut, Predictive Astrology, and Alchemist’s Handbook

Three new Weiser Classics editions became available on Wednesday, June 1 and these are essential reading for those looking for a well-rounded occult education. Let’s take a quick look at each.

Let me begin with the book I am least familiar with — Predictive Astrology: Tools to Forecast Your Life & Create Your Brightest Future by Bernadette Brady.

Predictive Astrology shows the reader how to use Time Maps to approach to the fate of the transits, and includes new methods for calibrating and filtering progressions, returns of all kinds, eclipses, and planetary areas. By combining these techniques, you can reveal the future and put various aspects of your life into perspective.

Offering many new techniques and concepts, this classic groundbreaking work (first published in 1976) is finding a new and growing audience. The book brings predictive astrology into a world of its own.

This new Weiser Classics edition includes a new foreword by Theresa Reed, author of Astrology for Real Life.

I am not much of an astrologer. Oh, sure, I can weasel my way around a chart and wrap my head around the basics. Reading this book for the first time was a real eye opener as it introduced new concepts to me that helped rearrange my thought processes around the map of the heavens and how they relate to your birth chart and portent analysis.

Definitely a must-read if you haven’t before and this edition is lovingly produced. You want charts and diagrams? This one delivers. You can buy Predictive Astrology HERE. At $26.96, this feels like a bargain.

Alchemist’s Handbook by Frater Albertus is the very definition of classic. I first read this in the mid-1980s, discovered in the occult stacks in the Ball State Library. I quickly devoured it. The subject matter was more in line with my roommate’s fascinations, he was well suited to the practice of chemistry, excelling in the sciences, so we studied it together. I was more at home with the philosophical side of the work. In this, my roommate and I made a great team, and Frater Albertus’ work was instrumental in both our developments.

The Alchemist’s Handbook has long been considered a modern-day classic on the actual practice of alchemy since its first publication in 1960. The book still stands as a groundbreaking work presenting in clear, concise language a practical manual of working knowledge that was formerly handed down only under oath of secrecy.

The scope of alchemical work is to provide both a means to synthesize all the other sciences and the necessary training of the intellectual and spiritual faculties. “Hermetic philosophy, with its practical arcanum,” writes Frater Albertus, “repeats itself over and over again in the ancient axiom ‘As above, so below. As below, so above.’”

The Alchemist’s Handbook discusses in detail:

  • The basic fundamental principles of alchemy.
  • A guide to the formation of an inexpensive home laboratory with illustrations of the necessary equipment.
  • Step-by-step instructions for the work of the Lesser Circulation, the alchemical transformation within the plant kingdom.

“The teachings of Frater Albertus are part of a lineage that traces back to Rosicrucian sources and much earlier and The Alchemist’s Handbook is still the best introduction to that lineage. If you feel the call of Alchemy and want real information on the subject, this is definitely the book you will want to read, reread, and read again. It may just turn out to be the book that changes your life.”—From the foreword by Robert Allen Bartlett, author of Real Alchemy: A Primer of Practical Alchemy

First published by Weiser Books in 1974, this new Weiser Classics edition includes a new foreword by Robert Allen Bartlett, author of Real Alchemy.

I thoroughly enjoyed Bartlett’s Foreword, and was not surprised that his early experiments were with damiana, as were my own. I was only moderately successful with it, but it was a start. Alchemist’s Handbook is a treasure. If you don’t have this in your collection, you need to rectify that post haste. You can get a copy HERE for only $18.95. Well worth every penny.

Finally, we have a personal favorite — Liber Null and Psychonaut by Peter J. Carroll. On the “Mount Rushmore of Chaos Magick you’ll find Carroll there, alongside Austin Osman Spare, Phil Hine, and Ramsey Dukes.

Peter Carroll’s classic work has been profound influence on the Western magical world and on the practice of chaos magick in particular. In Liber Null and Psychonaut, Carroll presents an approach to the practice of magic that draws on the foundations of shamanism and animism, as well as that found in the Greek magical papyri, the occult works of Eliphas Levi and Aleister Crowley, and the esoteric meditative practices of classical India and China. Also very much at work in the text are 20th century scientific ideas of quantum physics and chaos theory.

The result is a profoundly original work of magical studies that also includes a selection of extremely powerful rituals and exercises for committed occultists with instructions that lead the reader through new concepts and practices to achieve Carroll’s definition of magic itself: the raising of the whole individual in perfect balance to the power of infinity.

This Weiser Classics edition is a thoroughly revised republication of Liber Null and Psychonaut, first published by Weiser in 1987, and includes a new foreword by Ronald Hutton, a leading authority on modern witchcraft and paganism.

I discussed Liber Null & Psychonaut, in general, and Chaos Magick, in particular, with my friend, Freeman Presson, and Weiser Books’ Lisa Trudeau (aka Ahnkie) back in March of 2011, when Red Wheel/Weiser last released this book. It’s worth a read, I think. And I made a short post about Chaos Magick in reference to Magical (Dis)Orders back in 2015 that is somewhat apropos, especially considering the release of Stranger Things’ season four, and the synchronicity of 1986.

All this to say that, Liber Null and Psychonaut are hugely influential books on me. As they are both now bound together, I impress upon you the necessity for you making these a part of your library. I don’t see anything dramatically different from the previous 2011 release, other than the new foreword by Hutton, which is quite nice, but perhaps, like me, you already own several copies and differing editions? What’s one more? This one’s lovely and priced to sell at $18.95. Click HERE to bring it home.

There you have it, Three for Thursday, I suppose. I cannot recommend these Weiser Classics highly enough. They are quality editions, lovingly reproduced, and in all cases, the new forewords add to the experience.

We are living in dark times. Treat yourself to a bit of the light. That’s what these books, and others like them, represent. Portable light to drive back the shadow.

Buy now. Thank me later.

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