Three for Thursday: Strange & Unusual Books I Read as a Kid Edition

I’m back from my month long RPGaDay celebration and deadline slaying. Still, I wasn’t absent completely. I hope you enjoyed the recent book reviews I managed to post. I read some great titles from Llewellyn Books (especially Thorn Mooney’s The Witch’s Path) that really put me in delicious mood (and there are more to come), and now here we are, slowly sliding into the “Unofficial End of Summer”.

Well, Magick Books are on my mind, and as I sit here listening to Shawn Hebert’s The LVX Files and his chat with author/witch Jason Mankey (much discussion of DJ Conway and Silver Ravenwolf right now), I thought, “what better subject for Three for Thursday than the three most influential strange and unusual books that I read as a child”.

Hopefully you’re up for playing along. Let’s have at it…

THREE

In 1976, I was 10 years old, attending 4th grade in the old haunted Converse High School. After school let out I often got to stay behind and help my grandmother clean the building (which was always a treat for me). One day, in the boiler room basement, I was rooting through the lost and found box that grandma always kept down there, and lo and behold, look what Bobby found — Hans Holzer’s Ghost Hunter. Needless to say, a great and influential read. Holzer was a groundbreaking pioneer of the paranormal and I still use many of his ideas to this very day.

TWO

This book I nicked from the Converse Public Library when I was in the 3rd grade. I was already fascinated by witchcraft and the occult. Finding this book by Sybil Leek, whom I had seen many times on tv and read about in the tabloids was a thrill. This one certainly got my head spinning…

ONE

If you’re a frequent follower of this blog, you know the story behind this book. My first treatise on the magical world. Discovered when I was 8 years old, already long fascinated by the Occult, the Bermuda Triangle, Bigfoot, the Lost City of Atlantis, ESP, Magic, and Oak Island (etcetera, ad nauseum). Many Palmer Hall pulled back the veil and made me believe.

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