Project Blue Book is still solid TV entertainment

Catching up on Project Blue Book, History Channel’s retelling (mostly reimagining) of the US Air Force’s investigations into UFO sightings from 1952 – 1969, the series continues to be a treat. Admittedly, the stories have been as far from reality as one can manage, but entertaining, none-the-less.

The show is big on atmosphere and Aidan Gillen continues to impress, as does Ksensia Solo as the spy keeping tabs on Dr. Hynek’s wife and milking her for information.

blue-book-susie-s1e2

The second episode followed the case of The Flatwoods Monster. The only similarities between the show and the actual case lies in the fact that a meteorite crashed in rural West Virginia, near Flatwoods, and some people reported it as a flying saucer crash and a “monster” was seen after.

Eyewitness sightings detailed a crude sort of robot, as opposed to History’s tree creature.

The Air Force reported the fireball was a meteorite, as confirmed by an Ohio Astronomy Club. The show followed that example, but through in more Men in Black activity, the mysterious tarped saucer at the end, not to mention the Russian Agent’s attempt at seducing Mrs. Hynek.

lubbock-lights

The third episode, “The Lubbock Lights”, hews a little closer to the actual events, but three in and we’re seeing a theme — government cover-up and conspiracy is the order of the day, and it makes for exciting tv.

The official culprit in Lubbock was plovers, small birds flying in formation, the city lights reflecting off their white underbellies. Of course Lieutenant Ruppelt, of Projects Grudge and Blue Book fame, disagreed with the assessment.

Ruppelt, prior to his death from a heart attack at the age of 37, called the UFO phenomena a “space age myth”.

Project Blue Book is far closer to fiction than fact, and I am more than fine with that. While I have long had a fascination with so-called UFO phenomena, I am enjoying this X-Files-esque retread. It reminds me of Project U.F.O., Jack Webb’s short lived series from the late 70s that was must-see-tv for me.

jordon-swaim

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